Your browser does not support JavaScript!

205, Al Qaizi Building, Al Muteena Street, Deira 40192 AE
JollyRX
205, Al Qaizi Building, Al Muteena Street, Deira , AE
+918003633988 https://cdn1.storehippo.com/s/6052eead9e1cf8aa024c48c8/606ecab786617735b12707ae/webp/jollyrx-480x480.png" contact@jollyrx.com
61b05c984eb20eaf41c8eb07 GIOTRIF 30 MG 28 TAB. https://cdn1.storehippo.com/s/6052eead9e1cf8aa024c48c8/61b05c65496def3b5c7cd41e/webp/giotrif-30-mg-28-tab-.jpg

What is Gilotrif and how is it used?

Gilotrif is a prescription medicine used to treat the symptoms of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer. Gilotrif may be used alone or with other medications.

Gilotrif belongs to a class of drugs called Antineoplastics, Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor; Antineoplastics, EGFR Inhibitor.

It is not known if Gilotrif is safe and effective in children.

What are the possible side effects of Gilotrif?

Gilotrif may cause serious side effects including:

  • hives,
  • difficulty breathing,
  • swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat,
  • new or worsening cough,
  • fever,
  • severe or ongoing diarrhea (lasting 2 days or longer),
  • severe skin reaction that causes blistering and peeling,
  • pain, redness, numbness, and peeling skin on your hands or feet,
  • blisters or ulcers in your mouth,
  • red or swollen gums,
  • trouble swallowing,
  • eye pain or redness,
  • blurred vision,
  • watery eyes,
  • feeling like something is in your eye,
  • increased sensitivity to light,
  • stomach pain (upper right side),
  • easy bruising,
  • unusual bleeding,
  • tiredness,
  • dark urine,
  • clay-colored stools,
  • yellowing of the skin or eyes (jaundice),
  • pounding heartbeats,
  • fluttering in your chest,
  • shortness of breath,
  • swelling in your legs and ankles, and
  • rapid weight gain

Get medical help right away, if you have any of the symptoms listed above.

The most common side effects of Gilotrif include:

  • mild diarrhea for 1 day or less,
  • nausea,
  • vomiting,
  • loss of appetite,
  • mouth sores,
  • acne,
  • itching,
  • dry skin, and
  • redness, pain, swelling, or other signs of infection around your fingernails or toenails

Tell the doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

These are not all the possible side effects of Gilotrif. For more information, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

SIDE EFFECTS

The following clinically significant adverse reactions are described elsewhere in the labeling:

Clinical Trials Experience

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

The data in the Warnings and Precautions section reflect exposure to GILOTRIF for clinically significant adverse reactions in 4257 patients enrolled in LUX-Lung 3 (n=229) and LUX-Lung 8 (n=392), and 3636 patients with cancer enrolled in 42 studies of GILOTRIF administered alone or in combination with other anti-neoplastic drugs at GILOTRIF doses ranging from 10-70 mg daily or at doses 10-160 mg in other regimens. The mean exposure was 5.5 months. The population included patients with various cancers, the most common of which were NSCLC, breast, colorectal, brain, and head and neck.

The data described below reflect exposure to GILOTRIF as a single agent in LUX-Lung 3, a randomized, active-controlled trial conducted in patients with EGFR mutation-positive, metastatic NSCLC, and in LUX-Lung 8, a randomized, active-controlled trial in patients with metastatic squamous NSCLC progressing after platinum-based chemotherapy.

EGFR Mutation-Positive Metastatic NSCLC

The safety of GILOTRIF was evaluated in 229 EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor-naïve patients with EGFR mutation-positive, metastatic non-squamous NSCLC enrolled in a randomized (2:1), multicenter, open-label trial (LUX-Lung 3). Patients received either GILOTRIF 40 mg daily until documented disease progression or intolerance to the therapy or pemetrexed 500 mg/m² followed after 30 minutes by cisplatin 75 mg/m² every three weeks for a maximum of six treatment courses. The median exposure was 11 months for patients treated with GILOTRIF and 3.4 months for patients treated with pemetrexed/cisplatin.

The overall trial population had a median age of 61 years; 61% of patients in the GILOTRIF arm and 60% of patients in the pemetrexed/cisplatin arm were younger than 65 years. A total of 64% of patients on GILOTRIF and 67% of pemetrexed/cisplatin patients were female. More than two-thirds of patients were from Asia (GILOTRIF 70%; pemetrexed/cisplatin 72%).

Serious adverse reactions were reported in 29% of patients treated with GILOTRIF. The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in patients treated with GILOTRIF were diarrhea (6.6%); vomiting (4.8%); and dyspnea, fatigue, and hypokalemia (1.7% each). Fatal adverse reactions in GILOTRIF-treated patients in LUX-Lung 3 included pulmonary toxicity/ILD-like adverse reactions (1.3%), sepsis (0.43%), and pneumonia (0.43%).

Dose reductions due to adverse reactions were required in 57% of GILOTRIF-treated patients. The most frequent adverse reactions that led to dose reduction in the patients treated with GILOTRIF were diarrhea (20%), rash/acne (19%), paronychia (14%), and stomatitis (10%). Discontinuation of therapy in GILOTRIF-treated patients for adverse reactions was 14.0%. The most frequent adverse reactions that led to discontinuation in GILOTRIF-treated patients were diarrhea (1.3%), ILD (0.9%), and paronychia (0.9%).

Clinical trials of GILOTRIF excluded patients with an abnormal left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), i.e., below the institutional lower limit of normal. In LUX-Lung 3, all patients were evaluated for LVEF at screening and every 9 weeks thereafter in the GILOTRIF-treated group and as needed in the pemetrexed/cisplatin group. More GILOTRIF-treated patients (2.2%; n=5) experienced ventricular dysfunction (defined as diastolic dysfunction, left ventricular dysfunction, or ventricular dilation; all < Grade 3) compared to chemotherapy-treated patients (0.9%; n=1).

WARNINGS

Included as part of the "PRECAUTIONS" Section

PRECAUTIONS

Diarrhea

Diarrhea has resulted in dehydration with or without renal impairment across the clinical experience; some cases were fatal. Grade 3-4 diarrhea occurred in 697 (16%) of the 4257 patients who received GILOTRIF across 44 clinical trials. In LUX-Lung 3, diarrhea occurred in 96% of patients treated with GILOTRIF (n=229), of which 15% were Grade 3 in severity and occurred within the first 6 weeks. Renal impairment as a consequence of diarrhea occurred in 6% of patients treated with GILOTRIF, of which 1.3% were Grade 3. In LUX-Lung 8, diarrhea occurred in 75% of patients treated with GILOTRIF (n=392), of which 10% were Grade 3 in severity and 0.8% were Grade 4 in severity. Renal impairment as a consequence of diarrhea occurred in 7% of patients treated with GILOTRIF, of which 2% were Grade 3 [see ADVERSE REACTIONS].

For patients who develop prolonged Grade 2 diarrhea lasting more than 48 hours or greater than or equal to Grade 3 diarrhea, withhold GILOTRIF until diarrhea resolves to Grade 1 or less and resume GILOTRIF with appropriate dose reduction [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION]. Provide patients with an anti-diarrheal agent (e.g., loperamide) for self-administration at the onset of diarrhea and instruct patients to continue anti-diarrheal therapy until loose bowel movements cease for 12 hours.

Bullous And Exfoliative Skin Disorders

Grade 3 cutaneous reactions characterized by bullous, blistering, and exfoliating skin lesions, occurred in 0.2% of the 4257 patients who received GILOTRIF across clinical trials. In LUX-Lung 3, the overall incidence of cutaneous reactions consisting of rash, erythema, and acneiform rash was 90%, and the incidence of Grade 3 cutaneous reactions was 16%. In addition, the incidence of Grade 1-3 palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome was 7%. In LUX-Lung 8, the overall incidence of cutaneous reactions consisting of rash, erythema, and acneiform rash was 70%, and the incidence of Grade 3 cutaneous reactions was 7%. In addition, the incidence of Grade 1-3 palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome was 1.5% [see ADVERSE REACTIONS].

Discontinue GILOTRIF in patients who develop life-threatening bullous, blistering, or exfoliating skin lesions. For patients who develop prolonged Grade 2 cutaneous adverse reactions lasting more than 7 days, intolerable Grade 2 cutaneous reactions, or Grade 3 cutaneous reactions, withhold GILOTRIF until the adverse reaction resolves to Grade 1 or less and resume GILOTRIF with appropriate dose reduction [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION].

Postmarketing cases consistent with toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) and Stevens Johnson syndrome (SJS) have been reported in patients receiving GILOTRIF. The cases of TEN and SJS bullous skin reactions result from a distinct and separate mechanism of toxicity than the bullous skin lesions secondary to the pharmacologic action of the drug on the epidermal growth factor receptor. Discontinue GILOTRIF if TEN or SJS is suspected [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION].

Interstitial Lung Disease

Interstitial lung disease or ILD-like adverse reactions (e.g., lung infiltration, pneumonitis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, or alveolitis allergic) occurred in 1.6% of the 4257 patients who received GILOTRIF across clinical trials; of these, 0.4% were fatal. The incidence of ILD appeared to be higher in Asian patients (2.3%; 38/1657) as compared to Whites (1.0%; 23/2241). In LUX-Lung 3, the incidence of Grade ≥3 ILD was 1.3% and resulted in death in 1% of GILOTRIF-treated patients. In LUX-Lung 8, the incidence of Grade ≥3 ILD was 0.9% and resulted in death in 0.8% of GILOTRIF-treated patients.

Withhold GILOTRIF during evaluation of patients with suspected ILD and discontinue GILOTRIF in patients with confirmed ILD [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION].

Hepatic Toxicity

In 4257 patients who received GILOTRIF across clinical trials, 9.7% had liver test abnormalities, of which 0.2% were fatal. In LUX-Lung 3, liver test abnormalities of any grade occurred in 17.5% of the patients treated with GILOTRIF, of which 3.5% had Grade 3-4 liver test abnormalities. In LUX-Lung 8, liver test abnormalities of any grade occurred in 6% of the patients treated with GILOTRIF, of which 0.2% had Grade 3-4 liver test abnormalities.

Obtain periodic liver testing in patients during treatment with GILOTRIF. Withhold GILOTRIF in patients who develop worsening of liver function [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION]. In patients who develop severe hepatic impairment while taking GILOTRIF, discontinue treatment.

Gastrointestinal Perforation

Gastrointestinal perforation, including fatal cases, has occurred with GILOTRIF. Gastrointestinal perforation has been reported in 0.2% of patients treated with GILOTRIF among 3213 patients across 17 randomized controlled clinical trials. Patients receiving concomitant corticosteroids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or anti-angiogenic agents, or patients with increasing age or who have an underlying history of gastrointestinal ulceration, underlying diverticular disease or bowel metastases may be at increased risk of perforation.

Permanently discontinue GILOTRIF in patients who develop gastrointestinal perforation [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION].

Keratitis

Keratitis, characterized as acute or worsening eye inflammation, lacrimation, light sensitivity, blurred vision, eye pain, and/or red eye occurred in 0.7% of patients treated with GILOTRIF among 4257 patients across clinical trials, of which 0.05% of patients experienced Grade 3 keratitis. Keratitis was reported in 2.2% patients in LUX-Lung 3, with Grade 3 in 0.4%. In LUX-Lung 8, keratitis was reported in 0.3% patients; there were no patients with ≥Grade 3 keratitis.

Withhold GILOTRIF during evaluation of patients with suspected keratitis, and if diagnosis of ulcerative keratitis is confirmed, interrupt or discontinue GILOTRIF [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION]. If keratitis is diagnosed, the benefits and risks of continuing treatment should be carefully considered. GILOTRIF should be used with caution in patients with a history of keratitis, ulcerative keratitis, or severe dry eye [see ADVERSE REACTIONS]. Contact lens use is also a risk factor for keratitis and ulceration.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity

Based on findings from animal studies and its mechanism of action, GILOTRIF can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Administration of afatinib to pregnant rabbits during organogenesis at exposures approximately 0.2 times the exposure in humans at the recommended dose of 40 mg daily resulted in embryotoxicity and, in rabbits showing maternal toxicity, increased abortions at late gestational stages. Advise pregnant women and females of reproductive potential of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment and for at least 2 weeks after the last dose of GILOTRIF [see Use In Specific Populations].

SKU-Z6JQAUDYCETZ
in stock INR 100
1 1

GIOTRIF 30 MG 28 TAB.

₹100


Sold By: jollyrx
VARIANT SELLER PRICE QUANTITY

Description of product

What is Gilotrif and how is it used?

Gilotrif is a prescription medicine used to treat the symptoms of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer. Gilotrif may be used alone or with other medications.

Gilotrif belongs to a class of drugs called Antineoplastics, Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor; Antineoplastics, EGFR Inhibitor.

It is not known if Gilotrif is safe and effective in children.

What are the possible side effects of Gilotrif?

Gilotrif may cause serious side effects including:

  • hives,
  • difficulty breathing,
  • swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat,
  • new or worsening cough,
  • fever,
  • severe or ongoing diarrhea (lasting 2 days or longer),
  • severe skin reaction that causes blistering and peeling,
  • pain, redness, numbness, and peeling skin on your hands or feet,
  • blisters or ulcers in your mouth,
  • red or swollen gums,
  • trouble swallowing,
  • eye pain or redness,
  • blurred vision,
  • watery eyes,
  • feeling like something is in your eye,
  • increased sensitivity to light,
  • stomach pain (upper right side),
  • easy bruising,
  • unusual bleeding,
  • tiredness,
  • dark urine,
  • clay-colored stools,
  • yellowing of the skin or eyes (jaundice),
  • pounding heartbeats,
  • fluttering in your chest,
  • shortness of breath,
  • swelling in your legs and ankles, and
  • rapid weight gain

Get medical help right away, if you have any of the symptoms listed above.

The most common side effects of Gilotrif include:

  • mild diarrhea for 1 day or less,
  • nausea,
  • vomiting,
  • loss of appetite,
  • mouth sores,
  • acne,
  • itching,
  • dry skin, and
  • redness, pain, swelling, or other signs of infection around your fingernails or toenails

Tell the doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

These are not all the possible side effects of Gilotrif. For more information, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

SIDE EFFECTS

The following clinically significant adverse reactions are described elsewhere in the labeling:

Clinical Trials Experience

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

The data in the Warnings and Precautions section reflect exposure to GILOTRIF for clinically significant adverse reactions in 4257 patients enrolled in LUX-Lung 3 (n=229) and LUX-Lung 8 (n=392), and 3636 patients with cancer enrolled in 42 studies of GILOTRIF administered alone or in combination with other anti-neoplastic drugs at GILOTRIF doses ranging from 10-70 mg daily or at doses 10-160 mg in other regimens. The mean exposure was 5.5 months. The population included patients with various cancers, the most common of which were NSCLC, breast, colorectal, brain, and head and neck.

The data described below reflect exposure to GILOTRIF as a single agent in LUX-Lung 3, a randomized, active-controlled trial conducted in patients with EGFR mutation-positive, metastatic NSCLC, and in LUX-Lung 8, a randomized, active-controlled trial in patients with metastatic squamous NSCLC progressing after platinum-based chemotherapy.

EGFR Mutation-Positive Metastatic NSCLC

The safety of GILOTRIF was evaluated in 229 EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor-naïve patients with EGFR mutation-positive, metastatic non-squamous NSCLC enrolled in a randomized (2:1), multicenter, open-label trial (LUX-Lung 3). Patients received either GILOTRIF 40 mg daily until documented disease progression or intolerance to the therapy or pemetrexed 500 mg/m² followed after 30 minutes by cisplatin 75 mg/m² every three weeks for a maximum of six treatment courses. The median exposure was 11 months for patients treated with GILOTRIF and 3.4 months for patients treated with pemetrexed/cisplatin.

The overall trial population had a median age of 61 years; 61% of patients in the GILOTRIF arm and 60% of patients in the pemetrexed/cisplatin arm were younger than 65 years. A total of 64% of patients on GILOTRIF and 67% of pemetrexed/cisplatin patients were female. More than two-thirds of patients were from Asia (GILOTRIF 70%; pemetrexed/cisplatin 72%).

Serious adverse reactions were reported in 29% of patients treated with GILOTRIF. The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in patients treated with GILOTRIF were diarrhea (6.6%); vomiting (4.8%); and dyspnea, fatigue, and hypokalemia (1.7% each). Fatal adverse reactions in GILOTRIF-treated patients in LUX-Lung 3 included pulmonary toxicity/ILD-like adverse reactions (1.3%), sepsis (0.43%), and pneumonia (0.43%).

Dose reductions due to adverse reactions were required in 57% of GILOTRIF-treated patients. The most frequent adverse reactions that led to dose reduction in the patients treated with GILOTRIF were diarrhea (20%), rash/acne (19%), paronychia (14%), and stomatitis (10%). Discontinuation of therapy in GILOTRIF-treated patients for adverse reactions was 14.0%. The most frequent adverse reactions that led to discontinuation in GILOTRIF-treated patients were diarrhea (1.3%), ILD (0.9%), and paronychia (0.9%).

Clinical trials of GILOTRIF excluded patients with an abnormal left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), i.e., below the institutional lower limit of normal. In LUX-Lung 3, all patients were evaluated for LVEF at screening and every 9 weeks thereafter in the GILOTRIF-treated group and as needed in the pemetrexed/cisplatin group. More GILOTRIF-treated patients (2.2%; n=5) experienced ventricular dysfunction (defined as diastolic dysfunction, left ventricular dysfunction, or ventricular dilation; all < Grade 3) compared to chemotherapy-treated patients (0.9%; n=1).

WARNINGS

Included as part of the "PRECAUTIONS" Section

PRECAUTIONS

Diarrhea

Diarrhea has resulted in dehydration with or without renal impairment across the clinical experience; some cases were fatal. Grade 3-4 diarrhea occurred in 697 (16%) of the 4257 patients who received GILOTRIF across 44 clinical trials. In LUX-Lung 3, diarrhea occurred in 96% of patients treated with GILOTRIF (n=229), of which 15% were Grade 3 in severity and occurred within the first 6 weeks. Renal impairment as a consequence of diarrhea occurred in 6% of patients treated with GILOTRIF, of which 1.3% were Grade 3. In LUX-Lung 8, diarrhea occurred in 75% of patients treated with GILOTRIF (n=392), of which 10% were Grade 3 in severity and 0.8% were Grade 4 in severity. Renal impairment as a consequence of diarrhea occurred in 7% of patients treated with GILOTRIF, of which 2% were Grade 3 [see ADVERSE REACTIONS].

For patients who develop prolonged Grade 2 diarrhea lasting more than 48 hours or greater than or equal to Grade 3 diarrhea, withhold GILOTRIF until diarrhea resolves to Grade 1 or less and resume GILOTRIF with appropriate dose reduction [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION]. Provide patients with an anti-diarrheal agent (e.g., loperamide) for self-administration at the onset of diarrhea and instruct patients to continue anti-diarrheal therapy until loose bowel movements cease for 12 hours.

Bullous And Exfoliative Skin Disorders

Grade 3 cutaneous reactions characterized by bullous, blistering, and exfoliating skin lesions, occurred in 0.2% of the 4257 patients who received GILOTRIF across clinical trials. In LUX-Lung 3, the overall incidence of cutaneous reactions consisting of rash, erythema, and acneiform rash was 90%, and the incidence of Grade 3 cutaneous reactions was 16%. In addition, the incidence of Grade 1-3 palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome was 7%. In LUX-Lung 8, the overall incidence of cutaneous reactions consisting of rash, erythema, and acneiform rash was 70%, and the incidence of Grade 3 cutaneous reactions was 7%. In addition, the incidence of Grade 1-3 palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome was 1.5% [see ADVERSE REACTIONS].

Discontinue GILOTRIF in patients who develop life-threatening bullous, blistering, or exfoliating skin lesions. For patients who develop prolonged Grade 2 cutaneous adverse reactions lasting more than 7 days, intolerable Grade 2 cutaneous reactions, or Grade 3 cutaneous reactions, withhold GILOTRIF until the adverse reaction resolves to Grade 1 or less and resume GILOTRIF with appropriate dose reduction [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION].

Postmarketing cases consistent with toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) and Stevens Johnson syndrome (SJS) have been reported in patients receiving GILOTRIF. The cases of TEN and SJS bullous skin reactions result from a distinct and separate mechanism of toxicity than the bullous skin lesions secondary to the pharmacologic action of the drug on the epidermal growth factor receptor. Discontinue GILOTRIF if TEN or SJS is suspected [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION].

Interstitial Lung Disease

Interstitial lung disease or ILD-like adverse reactions (e.g., lung infiltration, pneumonitis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, or alveolitis allergic) occurred in 1.6% of the 4257 patients who received GILOTRIF across clinical trials; of these, 0.4% were fatal. The incidence of ILD appeared to be higher in Asian patients (2.3%; 38/1657) as compared to Whites (1.0%; 23/2241). In LUX-Lung 3, the incidence of Grade ≥3 ILD was 1.3% and resulted in death in 1% of GILOTRIF-treated patients. In LUX-Lung 8, the incidence of Grade ≥3 ILD was 0.9% and resulted in death in 0.8% of GILOTRIF-treated patients.

Withhold GILOTRIF during evaluation of patients with suspected ILD and discontinue GILOTRIF in patients with confirmed ILD [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION].

Hepatic Toxicity

In 4257 patients who received GILOTRIF across clinical trials, 9.7% had liver test abnormalities, of which 0.2% were fatal. In LUX-Lung 3, liver test abnormalities of any grade occurred in 17.5% of the patients treated with GILOTRIF, of which 3.5% had Grade 3-4 liver test abnormalities. In LUX-Lung 8, liver test abnormalities of any grade occurred in 6% of the patients treated with GILOTRIF, of which 0.2% had Grade 3-4 liver test abnormalities.

Obtain periodic liver testing in patients during treatment with GILOTRIF. Withhold GILOTRIF in patients who develop worsening of liver function [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION]. In patients who develop severe hepatic impairment while taking GILOTRIF, discontinue treatment.

Gastrointestinal Perforation

Gastrointestinal perforation, including fatal cases, has occurred with GILOTRIF. Gastrointestinal perforation has been reported in 0.2% of patients treated with GILOTRIF among 3213 patients across 17 randomized controlled clinical trials. Patients receiving concomitant corticosteroids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or anti-angiogenic agents, or patients with increasing age or who have an underlying history of gastrointestinal ulceration, underlying diverticular disease or bowel metastases may be at increased risk of perforation.

Permanently discontinue GILOTRIF in patients who develop gastrointestinal perforation [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION].

Keratitis

Keratitis, characterized as acute or worsening eye inflammation, lacrimation, light sensitivity, blurred vision, eye pain, and/or red eye occurred in 0.7% of patients treated with GILOTRIF among 4257 patients across clinical trials, of which 0.05% of patients experienced Grade 3 keratitis. Keratitis was reported in 2.2% patients in LUX-Lung 3, with Grade 3 in 0.4%. In LUX-Lung 8, keratitis was reported in 0.3% patients; there were no patients with ≥Grade 3 keratitis.

Withhold GILOTRIF during evaluation of patients with suspected keratitis, and if diagnosis of ulcerative keratitis is confirmed, interrupt or discontinue GILOTRIF [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION]. If keratitis is diagnosed, the benefits and risks of continuing treatment should be carefully considered. GILOTRIF should be used with caution in patients with a history of keratitis, ulcerative keratitis, or severe dry eye [see ADVERSE REACTIONS]. Contact lens use is also a risk factor for keratitis and ulceration.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity

Based on findings from animal studies and its mechanism of action, GILOTRIF can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Administration of afatinib to pregnant rabbits during organogenesis at exposures approximately 0.2 times the exposure in humans at the recommended dose of 40 mg daily resulted in embryotoxicity and, in rabbits showing maternal toxicity, increased abortions at late gestational stages. Advise pregnant women and females of reproductive potential of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment and for at least 2 weeks after the last dose of GILOTRIF [see Use In Specific Populations].

User reviews

  0/5